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Phone numbers with the standard code 01955, associated with Wick, appear in the following registers:

  • 3,684 in the Telephone Preference Service (TPS)
  • 173 in the Corporate Telephone Preference Service (CTPS)
  • There are 18,925,837 numbers registered on TPS, and 2,292,871 numbers registered on CTPS (figures correct as of 17/1/2019).

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    Wick is a town and royal burgh in Caithness, in the far north of Scotland. The town straddles the River Wick and extends along both sides of Wick Bay. Wick Locality had a population of 6,954 at the time of the 2011 census, a decrease of 3.8% from 2001.

    Pulteneytown, which was developed on the south side of the river by the British Fisheries Society during the 19th century, was officially merged into the burgh in 1902.

    The town is on the main road linking John o' Groats with southern Britain. The Far North railway line links Wick railway station with southern Scotland and with Thurso, the other burgh of Caithness. Wick Airport is on Wick's northern outskirts. The airport has two usable runways. A third is derelict.

    The main offices of The John O'Groat Journal and The Caithness Courier are located in Wick, as are Caithness General Hospital , the Wick Carnegie Library and local offices of the Highland Council. Wick Sheriff Court is one of 16 sheriff courts serving the sheriffdom of Grampian, Highland and Islands.

    Iron Age activity in the parish of Wick is evident in the hill fort at Garrywhin. Evidence of activity around Wick from the Norse pagan period was discovered in 1837 when brooches and bracelets from the Norse were uncovered by archaeologists. The name Wick appears to be from a Norse word, vík, meaning bay, cf. also the word viking.

    Source: Wikipedia