Registration numbers by region and area code

<< Return to the main list

Phone numbers with the standard code 01962, associated with Winchester, appear in the following registers:

  • 24,291 in the Telephone Preference Service (TPS)
  • 2,599 in the Corporate Telephone Preference Service (CTPS)
  • There are 18,887,909 numbers registered on TPS, and 2,292,125 numbers registered on CTPS (figures correct as of 22/1/2019).

    Download results as a PDF >>


    Selectabase provide a range of targeted and proven direct marketing lists and services to help you reach and convert new prospects. Using affordable, accurate and responsive data from Selectabase you can create a targeted campaign to reach either businesses or consumers.

    So get the advantage…avoid climate data wastage and ensure your marketing campaign helps your bottom line with targeted mailing lists and data cleansing services from Selectabase.

    Buy Business Data for the corresponding area >>

    Buy Consumer Data for the corresponding area >>

    Discover TPS Checker >>

    Winchester is a city and the county town of Hampshire, England. The city lies at the heart of the wider City of Winchester, a local government district, and is located at the western end of the South Downs National Park, along the course of the River Itchen. It is situated 60 miles south-west of London and 13.6 miles from Southampton, its closest city. At the time of the 2011 Census, Winchester had a population of 45,184. The wider City of Winchester district which includes towns such as Alresford and Bishop's Waltham has a population of 116,800.

    Winchester developed from the Roman town of Venta Belgarum, which in turn developed from an Iron Age oppidum. Winchester's major landmark is Winchester Cathedral, one of the largest cathedrals in Europe, with the distinction of having the longest nave and overall length of all Gothic cathedrals in Europe. The city is home to the University of Winchester and Winchester College, the oldest public school in the United Kingdom still using its original buildings.[citation needed]

    The area around Winchester has been inhabited since prehistoric times, with three Iron Age hillforts, Oram's Arbour, St. Catherine's Hill, and Worthy Down all in the nearby vicinity. In the Late Iron Age, a more urban settlement type developed, known as an oppidum, although the archaeology of this phase remains obscure. It was overrun by the confederation of Gaulish tribes known as the Belgae sometime during the first century BCE. It seems to have been known as Wentā or Venta, derived from the Brittonic for "town" or "meeting place", or the word for "white" , due to Winchester's situation upon chalk.

    After the Roman conquest of Britain, the settlement served as the capital of the Belgae and was distinguished as Venta Belgarum, "Venta of the Belgae". Although in the early years of the Roman province it was of subsidiary importance to Silchester and Chichester, Venta eclipsed them both by the latter half of the second century. At the beginning of the third century, Winchester was given protective stone walls. At around this time the city covered an area of 144 acres , making it among the largest towns in Roman Britain by surface area. There was a limited suburban area outside the walls. Like many other Roman towns however, Winchester began to decline in the later fourth century.

    Following the Roman withdrawal from Britain in 410, urban life seems to have continued at Venta Belgarum until around 450 AD, and a small administrative centre might have continued after that on the site of the later Anglo-Saxon palace. Ford identifies the community as the Cair Guinntguic listed by Nennius among the 28 cities of Britain in his History of the Britons. Amid the Saxon invasions of Britain, cemeteries dating to the 6th and 7th centuries suggest a revival of settlement.

    Source: Wikipedia